Level Up your LMC with Game-based Learning

By Kat Shanahan
Re-posted from Filament Games: Real games. Real learning

We’ve shared classroom spotlights, efficacy studies, and testimonials that have demonstrated the benefits of using games in the classroom. But game-based learning can happen anywhere! We hear all the time that makerspaces and library media centers are also great places to try game-based learning. As an LMC Specialist, you might be in charge of some of the only devices or computers in the building, so it makes sense to provide an engaging learning environment with these tools. By using games in your LMC, you’re allowing students to experience gameplay in their own way, creating personalized, immersive learning experiences. Here are four reasons to level up your LMC with game-based learning.

Personalized Learning
Digital learning games allow students to explore content at their own pace. In library media centers, students are able to explore game levels, experiment in different environments, and build their creative problem solving skills free from distractions or time constraints. They’re free to try, fail, and iterate at their own pace – creating a truly personalized learning experience while building 21st Century Skills.

Immersive Experiences
What better place to help students understand complex concepts than an LMC? Surrounded by additional learning resources, students can fully immerse themselves in the content being presented through the game. If at any point they get stuck or want to learn more about specific topics, they’re surrounded by books, magazines, and other types of technology that can help them expand their understanding.

Engaging Resources
We’re not of the mindset that kids need to be “tricked” into learning, just as an LMC Specialist doesn’t want to trick students into a good book — learning should be enjoyable no matter the tool! We want a student’s game-based learning experience to be as engaging and rewarding as traditional video games. The added benefit of educational games is that students are exposed to experiences that are designed with specific learning outcomes in mind. Well-designed learning games go a step farther than traditional entertainment games and teach children skills and concepts that will impact their lives after the game is turned off. Well-designed learning games are engaging enough to keep students’ attention while unleashing their learning potential.

Equal Access
Library media centers are unique in that they provide equal access for every student in your school. Using game-based learning in your media center provides high-quality digital learning resources to students who may not have teachers who use game-based learning in their classroom, or personally own theses devices at home. Game-based learning has been shown to increase learning and engagement in students that may be struggling with traditional classroom teaching methods – your LMC is a great place to show support for those struggling students.

Have you already leveled up your LMC? Let us know how you’re using games-based learning in the comments below!

Link to examples of GBL and this site HERE

 

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New Games & Learning Site

gamesandlearning_logoReposted from gamesandlearning.org

About Games & Learning.org

Gamesandlearning.org is a news and information service aimed at increasing the amount of information available for those interested in developing and funding new educational games for children and young adults. The site is operated by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and is a project of the Games and Learning Publishing Council. The Council and the Site are made possible by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The gaming industry has grown to be a behemoth $65 billion-a-year industry, with products ranging from arcade-style shooter games to increasingly complex tools for learning and education. Although games have for decades made their way into classrooms and informal learning outlets, there are few major sources to inform the development and funding of games with overt or subtle educational components. Gamesandlearning.org provides an unbiased source for research to help those producers and funders who want their games to “do good” and to assess what has and has not worked.

To serve game developers and foundations, venture capitalists, government agencies and others who support the development of new games, we will produce a variety of content including:

  • Market snapshots. These brief reports will help to explain the potential markets for new games, including size, challenges and opportunities.
  • Translation of Research. These reports will offer possible takeaways that are often hidden in academic journals and highlight the best new research.
  • Explainers. These reports will explain some of the more arcane and jargon-filled aspects of the educational games market, introducing and analyzing key trends.
  • Commentaries. Track the thinking of some of the leaders in the industry through timely and engaging op-eds and audio interviews.
  • Future Features? Well, that is partly up to you. If you have news and information needs about this sector, please don’t hesitate to contact us with suggestions, critiques or rants.