Best Board Games of 2015

From Board in the Library

The board game hobby and industry is booming. Distribution into big box ret

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ail stores like Barnes & Noble and Target is commonplace.

Numerous games are coming out each during the year. It is nearly impossible to play, review, and then recommend which ones would be best for the library space (let alone attempt to determine which are appropriate to *your* library space and

the community which utilizes it). That said, there are dozens games worth discussing and recommending

with the best method to determine which games to include is to play as many as you can; explore what is out there; and listen to what your community is looking for.

These games are not the best games to start with. These are meant supplement an already existing board game collection. If you are looking for a good starter collection for your library, check out my previous six articles “Board in the Library.” My personal starter collection for the Bucks County Library System consisted of Carcassonne, Ticket to Ride, Splendor, Pandemic, Catan, and Forbidden Island at each branch with an additional strategy and children’s game. So we have a large selection of popular family games plus a few additional ones in the system for adults and experienced gamers (Dead of Winter, Sherlock Holmes: Consulting Detective, and Dark Stories).

Supplementing a few of the best games of 2015 will keep your collection relevant for the experienced. It will provide space for the emerging to grow their habit into more complex and engrossing games. It also provides an enriching social experience for patrons who may not have the resources to purchase games (which can be prohibitively pricey).

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Why You Should Care About Gaming in Libraries

techsoupforlibrariesFrom TechSoup for Libraries

Board and card games have a long history in libraries. Most librarians have no problem with a quiet game of chess or gin rummy, and many libraries make these and similar games available for checkout. Video games, on the other hand, haven’t always had the best reputation, so libraries have tended to steer clear of them until recently. The idea that video games cause violent behavior has been strongly disputed, but some librarians still feel that they’re a waste of time with no relevance to our profession. However, there’s more and more evidence that games in general and video games in particular develop a wide range of useful skills. Furthermore, gaming events in libraries can generate great publicity and they create a strong, lasting connection between teens and the one institution in town that actually supports and encourages the activity that they love so much.

Our purpose here is to describe the logistics and details you should think about before you host a gaming program. We will not be covering the steps you need to take to build a collection of video games for checkout, but the Further Resources section will lead you to information on that subject.

Continued at TechSoup for Libraries